New material temporarily tightens skin

Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Scientists Develop Material to Temporarily Smooth Wrinkles.

“Second skin” polymer could also be used to protect dry skin and deliver drugs.


“It’s an invisible layer that can provide a barrier, provide cosmetic improvement, and potentially deliver a drug locally to the area that’s being treated. Those three things together could really make it ideal for use in humans,” Daniel Anderson says.

Photo: Melanie Gonick/MIT



“It has to have the right optical properties, otherwise it won’t look good, and it has to have the right mechanical properties, otherwise it won’t have the right strength and it won’t perform correctly,” Robert Langer says.

Photo: Olivo Labs


Researchers at MIT, Massachusetts General Hospital, Living Proof, and Olivo Labs have built up another material that can briefly ensure and fix skin, and smooth wrinkles. With further improvement, it could likewise be utilized to convey medications to regard skin conditions, for example, skin inflammation and different sorts of dermatitis.

The material, a silicone-based polymer that could be connected on the skin as a flimsy, impalpable covering, emulates the mechanical and flexible properties of solid, young skin. In tests with human subjects, the analysts found that the material could reshape "eye sacks" under the lower eyelids furthermore improve skin hydration. This kind of "second skin" could likewise be adjusted to give durable bright security, the specialists say.

"It’s an invisible layer that can provide a barrier, provide cosmetic improvement, and potentially deliver a drug locally to the area that’s being treated. Those three things together could really make it ideal for use in humans," says Daniel Anderson, a  associate professor in MIT's Department of Chemical Engineering and an individual from MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research and Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES).

Anderson is one of the creators of a paper portraying the polymer in the May 9 online issue of Nature Materials. Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT and an individual from the Koch Institute, is the paper's senior creator, and the paper's lead creator is Betty Yu SM '98, ScD '02, previous VP at Living Proof. Langer and Anderson are prime supporters of Living Proof and Olivo Labs, and Yu earned her lord's and doctorate at MIT.



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